Why This Year’s Oscars Was The Most Historic Ever

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Why This Year’s Oscars Was The Most Historic Ever
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The 2014 Oscars was a huge night for ethnic minorities in the entertainment industry. The 86th annual awards show made history on much more than one occasion:

First black man to win Best Picture.

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Steve McQueen, director of 12 Years a Slave, made history as the first black man to accept an Academy Award for Best Picture.

 

First Latino to win Best Director.

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Mexican director Alfonso Cuarón won for Gravity, making it the first time a Latino has won in the category.

 

First Kenyan to win an Oscar.

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Lupita Nyong’o made her country proud with her win for Best Supporting Actress. Kenya’s president Uhuru Kenyatta celebrated her victory on Twitter, saying, “You are the pride of Africa.”

She also became only the sixth black actress in history to win the award -- the first was Hattie McDaniel in 1939 for Gone With The Wind.

 

First Filipino American to win an Oscar.

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Composer Robert Lopez alongside his wife Kristen Anderson-Lopez won Best Song for Frozen’s “Let It Go.” Bonus: His win also memorialized him with the esteemed EGOT (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony) title.

 

First African American to become President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

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Meet Cheryl Boone Isaacs, who showed it was even a big night of firsts behind-the-scenes.

 

Second African American to win Best Screenplay.

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John Ridley is the second black person to win for writing after Geoffrey Fletcher, who won for Precious in 2010.

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