Amanda Bynes 'Cries for Attention' with New Head-Shaving Photos

April 29, 2013 By:
Amanda Bynes 'Cries for Attention' with New Head-Shaving Photos

Everywhere you look, Amanda Bynes is gripping you by the neck and turning your attention in the opposite direction: towards her.

By now, we’re all accustomed to the retired actress’s selfies and obsessive @-messages directed squarely at Drake (her Twitter is practically the first site we visit on Firefox, before Gmail even), but shaving part of her head was something we didn’t expect.

Amanda tweeted the new half-shaved look during her most recent visit to the gym. Because some people wear Lululemon when they work out and some people are Amanda Bynes.

“At the gym! Rawr,” she captioned the series of photos/desperate pleas for attention.

But don’t just take our word for it. Dr. Adi Jaffe, founder and executive director at Alternatives Addiction Treatment Center, corroborates this telling sign.

“I think that shaving her head is a successful cry for attention,” Dr. Adi Jaffe tells Hollyscoop. “There is no question that Ms. Bynes needs to evaluate the impression she is leaving on the public, but without speaking with her directly it would be hard for me to say if she’s having a hard time or just a strange version of a good time.”

It’s what we’re all trying to figure out: just how self-aware Amanda is of this new impression she’s giving to her ever-watchful fan base.

Dr. Jaffe says this expected desire for celebrities to act out though is partly to blame for her behavior.

“Amanda lives in a world where ‘antics’ are a commodity,” the doctor explains, while also wary to single out her new hairstyle as an indicator of mental instability. “Amanda certainly seems to be changing her approach to the media and it seems to be working if her goal is to get attention.”

“The question is whether Amanda’s approach is purposefully aimed at getting her more attention or is an indication of reduced inhibitory control,” Dr. Jaffe says. “If it’s the latter, it might mean that professional intervention could help.”